Thursday, November 10, 2016

Twiddlemuff

I had never heard of a Twiddlemuff until the other day and the more I read about them the more I knew I had to knit one.

As the write up says in the link above:

"Twiddlemuffs are knitted muffs with interesting bits and bobs attached. Many patients with Alzheimer’s, arthritis and dementia find them comforting and therapeutic as they help encourage movement and brain stimulation"

What an interesting idea and such a simple one.  So I have decided to knit one for my step-father.  As he gets older his hands are always cold and getting arthritic.

I had some pale green and lemon yarn leftover.  So I am knitting the inside of the muff with that.  This is a great way to use up leftover yarn.

Have you heard of a twiddlemuff before?

9 comments:

Terra Hangen said...

When I saw the word twiddlemuff I HAD to read this post. What a cute word that might be a nice name for a kitten. I like the colors of your yarn.

Angela said...

These twiddlemuffs/sensory mittens/whatever are becoming very popular here in the UK. I have noticed that when we visit the Care Home with a group from Church to sing hymns, a number of the residents have their hands inside them.

stitchersanon said...

They are growing in popularity....look quite good fun to make as well x

mamasmercantile said...

I didn't recognise the word but have come across them before.

Anne in the kitchen said...

I have never heard of one, but I guess I have to get knitting. Mom is always cold and could use a lot of mental stimulation

William Kendall said...

I've never heard of them.

Anonymous said...

Gill....I would love to knit the Twiddlemuffs. My knitting group made over 3500 items last year all to be donated to local schools, boys and girls club, churches, veterans and more. We make many different items, but I have never heard of these muffs. Could you print out a simple direction and I can show it to my group. Many thanks....Bess from MA

Maria said...

Yes I've heard of them! The knitting for charity group I belong to have been making them for dementia patients and children with autism. The special education unit staff just love them as it calms the children down. Such a simple thing but so effective!

Jodiebodie said...

I had never heard of a twiddlemuff before either. My first thought was that it woukd be perfect for an autistic boot that I know who cannot sit still on a chair inked he is fidgeting with something.